apple, mac, tips, windows

Getting Text From Apple Pages on a PC in a Pinch

The other day I brought a .pages file into a classroom. The problem is all the computers at the school use MS Windows, which can’t open .pages files. Did I panic? Yes. Was all hope lost? Nope.

It turns out that the .pages extension is just a fancy compressed file. That means you can simply change the “.pages” extension to “.zip” or “.rar” and get at the file contents.

The simplest way to get at the text from there is to look in the folder called “QuickLook.” There should be a PDF in that folder with everything in the file. If you need to edit the text, you could simply copy and paste it into a new file. If you are using adobe acrobat it will probably have formatting oddities, so another option is to upload the PDF to Google Docs, which will allow you to convert, edit, and print the file.

If you are feeling really adventurous, there is a final option. The “index.xml” file contains the text and styling of the .pages file. It will look mostly like a bunch of code, but if you go all the way to the end of the file, you’ll find the text is in there.

Of course, none of these are the ideal way to handle .pages files. It is obviously much simpler to export the file as a PDF, RTF, or DOCX file. Just know that if the options are limited, there is still a way to pull a save off.

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Lonely Planet Getting it All Wrong

Today I decided I’d like to buy a Lonely Planet travel guide. I’m looking at the Japan guide. At Amazon I can get it for $19.13. I have an iPod Touch now so I though, maybe since they have all those snazy phrase books as apps for the iPhone / Touch they have PDF’s of their books. They do, but they dropped the ball completely. The PDF’s cost the same as the suggested retail price of the physical book— almost $30. Considering how much cheaper it is to sell an electronic file it should be at least as cheap as the physical book on Amazon. Or even better, those buying the book should get free PDF’s. I’d sign up for either of those, but who in their right mind would pay more for something that should cost much much less?

As a result I’m going to look elsewhere. I may end up buying the paperback, but I’ll freeze in hell before being squeezed for some jacked up PDF.

It is also worth noting that the aforementioned iTunes Apps have received somewhat poor reviews. To me this is a signal that Lonely Planet is not ready to make the next digital leap and that a smarter more savvy company has a golden opportunity laying in front of them.

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