apple, mac, tips, windows

Getting Text From Apple Pages on a PC in a Pinch

The other day I brought a .pages file into a classroom. The problem is all the computers at the school use MS Windows, which can’t open .pages files. Did I panic? Yes. Was all hope lost? Nope.

It turns out that the .pages extension is just a fancy compressed file. That means you can simply change the “.pages” extension to “.zip” or “.rar” and get at the file contents.

The simplest way to get at the text from there is to look in the folder called “QuickLook.” There should be a PDF in that folder with everything in the file. If you need to edit the text, you could simply copy and paste it into a new file. If you are using adobe acrobat it will probably have formatting oddities, so another option is to upload the PDF to Google Docs, which will allow you to convert, edit, and print the file.

If you are feeling really adventurous, there is a final option. The “index.xml” file contains the text and styling of the .pages file. It will look mostly like a bunch of code, but if you go all the way to the end of the file, you’ll find the text is in there.

Of course, none of these are the ideal way to handle .pages files. It is obviously much simpler to export the file as a PDF, RTF, or DOCX file. Just know that if the options are limited, there is still a way to pull a save off.

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OpenOffice Multiple Page Layouts in One Document

To Use Landscape and Portrait Page Orientation in the Same Document:

  1. Click on “Format” -> “Styles and Formating.” Then create a new page style with landscape orientation.
  2. Click on the first paragraph where you want the new page orientation to begin.
  3. Click on “Format” -> “Paragraph.”
  4. Click the “Text Flow” tab.
  5. Under “Breaks,” enable “Insert.” Then enable “With Page Style.” Select a page style that uses the page style you created in step 1.

For more detailed info with fancy pictures and such, go to the LinuxTopia.org website.

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technology

Ride the Apple Wave

Even champions of Microsoft Windows are switching over to the Mac. But that isn’t news anymore, what is interesting about this MIT Technology Review article is what caused Erika Jonietz to leave the PC behind. In her own words:

Ironically, playing around with Vista for more than a month has done what years of experience and exhortations from Mac-loving friends could not: it has converted me into a Mac fan.

I said it before, and I’ll say it again— Vista might be the best thing that ever happened to Apple. Vista’s high cost (in terms of both the OS, the hardware upgrades needed, and the inability to use many older peripherals— like a printer) coupled with increased limitations to counter “piracy” make it unappealing. Add to that the fact that many of the tauted “innovations” in Vista are already built into Mac’s OS X 10.4, which will be soon be replaced by OS X 10.5 (full of new features for Microsoft to add to the next version of their own OS due out sometime between 2015-2050).

People don’t want to monkey around with their computer just to get it to print, or spend hours removing adware, malware, viruses only to have their computer crash— as Erika puts it they “just want things to work, and with [the] Mac, they do.”

[tags]mac os x, microsoft vista, mit, switchers, vista reviewer[/tags]

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